Django Unchained: 10 Lines From 10 Reviews

Django Unchained: 10 Lines From 10 Reviews

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Ten lines from ten reviews of  Quentin Tarantino’s new film Django Unchained.  

1. “Django Unchained” is Tarantino’s most complete movie yet. It is also his most vital. His storytelling talents match the heft of the tale. Slavery is the bedeviling, nasty chapter in America’s story. Tarantino crafted a parable of decency versus evil for a generation that never saw “Roots.” — The Denver Post

2. ‘Django Unchained’ Is a Mixture of ‘Roots’ and Blaxploitation.” — The Ledger

3. “Rambling but in a jaunty, generous, let’s-shoot-the-works fashion, “Django Unchained” draws on dozens of westerns — some of them American, others from Italy and Germany — and includes a very funny travesty of the Ku Klux Klan that might have been an outtake from “Blazing Saddles.” — CNN

4. “Django Unchained is the most brutal film Quentin Tarantino has ever made.But the movie is also exciting and ironic and, at times, explosively funny: Even at his most serious, Tarantino can’t help but entertain and show you a good time.” — Miami Herald

5. “There’s something about [Tarantino’s] directorial delectation in all these acts of racial violence that left me not just physically but morally queasy… Fist-pumping righteousness and vague moral unease. Of course, provoking intense feelings is what Tarantino’s cinema is all about.” — Slate

6.  “There’s plenty of fun here – Waltz alone is worth the price of admission – but you may leave “Django Unchained” wishing for both more and less.” — Detroit News

7. “While so many ostensibly serious films explore murky moral ambiguity, Tarantino knows that it can be cathartic to see unalloyed villains, whether Nazis or slave owners, get their comeuppance.” — The Oreginian

8. “Tarantino has compared this road movie to “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” and the buddies’ trek across Marlboro vistas to the tune of Jim Croce’s “I Got a Name” is the closest thing to poignancy in the director’s canon. Just as the gun-slinging Schultz is more fair-minded than he initially seems, the unschooled Django grows into a formidably complex character through vestments, vocabulary and, finally, violence against his enemies.”  — St Louis Post Dispatch

9.  “Foxx as the smoldering icon of revenge against the institution of slavery… “Django Unchained” might make one worry that the onetime wunderkind was spinning his wheels…” — The Oregonian

10. “Sweet revenge.” — The San Francisco Chronicle

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