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1:11pm November 15, 2012

Retaliatory Racism and Pres. Obama’s Re-Election

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President Barack Obama’s re-election left the kooky, supremacist and privileged in a tizzy. It happened. They really have to see his ubiquitous brown face for four more years.

Below is a list of four post-election, retaliatory hot messes:

1) The Ole Miss (maybe) Meltdown 

Two students were arrested in a post-election gathering at the University of Mississippi. What began with a reported 30 to 40 people swelled to several hundreds in less than a half-hour, according to media reports. Photos showed students setting an Obama-Biden poster ablaze. NBC-affiliate WMC-TV reported that attendees heard racial slurs.

While school officials said that journalists and social media users blew the disturbance out of proportion, the maybe-event raised eyebrows because of the school’s history.

Ole Miss segregationists rioted over the enrollment of a black student, James Meredith, in 1962. U.S. Marshalls had to escort Meredith to campus. Two men were killed.

The ambiguous recent occurrence resulted in university condemnation.

In a statement the school said, “While we are grateful that there were no injuries and there was no property damage, we are very disappointed in those students who took a very immature and uncivil approach to expressing their views about the election.”

2) White People Mourn Romney 

As social media users and bloggers increasingly become pop culture scribes, the Tumblr page “White People Mourning Romney” features everything from heartbroken tweets to discounted Romney paraphernalia and photos of angst-filled faces.

3) Secession attempts 

Residents from all 50 states have filed petitions to secede from the United States. In order for a petition to undergo review, it must receive 25,000 signatures.  Many petitions begin with a request to “peacefully grant”  a specific state ” to withdraw from the United States of America and create its own NEW government.”

 4) Some Neo-Nazis, KKK members and clowns met 

People in clown ensembles crashed a Neo-Nazi and Ku Klux Klan anti-immigration rally in North Carolina.

The Grio posted the story Monday, which reported that a member of the Nationalist Socialist Party, a white power group, said that his organization wanted to create a third party to oppose the existing two-party system.

A youth coordinator for Charlotte’s Latin American Council said, “The message from us is, you look silly. We’re dressed like clowns and you’re the ones that look funny.”

The supremacists were outnumbered 5 to 1 by people in clown garb. Two hours later the exchange ended nonviolently.

Progress

While none of the above hot messes severely harmed anyone, they highlight fringe concerns and fears. To some, America is less about expansion and more about maintaining the status quo. And race, unfortunately, plays a role.

Regardless of resistance, the president’s support from people of color, women, and educated voters demonstrates that masses believe in him to lead the country for another term.

This election’s backlash magnified America’s blemishes.

The political process galvanizes groups. It stimulates nationwide communication, criticism and causes engagement. It also magnetizes trolls and causes others to exhibit troll-tendencies.

Despite voter disenfranchisement tactics and doubters, Obama won. And at some point saltiness should dissolve because America needs cohesion to improve.

Hoping for Obama’s failure more than personal success profits nary a citizen.

Neither does lamenting that this magical Negro expected to adjust the Earth’s axis meandered back into the hopes and ballots of his constituency.

The president was entrusted by America with more time to improve conditions he inherited, tighten administrative loopholes and transition rhetoric to reality.

Can we move forward?



About the Author

Imani Jackson
Imani Jackson
Imani Jackson is a journalist and FAMU College of Law student with social commentary and/or news stories published on HBCU Digest, Clutch Magazine, the Daily American newspaper in Somerset, Pa, and the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education.




 
 

 
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