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12:57pm October 1, 2012

Florida’s Black and Latino Students Improve SAT Scores

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College Board statistics show that Florida’s graduating seniors made significant gains on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) during the 2011-2012 school year. Latino and Black student performance were also particularly noteworthy in the sunshine state.

The mean score for Florida’s Latino students in critical reading assessments was 30 points higher than the national score.  The scores were 13 points higher in math and 20 points higher in writing.

Black students improved their critical reading scores by seven points, while national scores did not change. Florida’s Black students increased their math scores by three points.

As school systems gear pedagogy toward test performance, and the U.S. continues to become blacker and browner, the performance of Florida’s students has national relevance.

For many students and parents test scores mean college opportunities and better lifetime earning potential and options stemming from education. As the U.S. competes in a global economy, the pressure to produce viable students to learn, work with and lead the people of tomorrow remains at the forefront.

The SAT score improvements are points of pride and gratitude for academics.

“I want to thank our state’s educators for their selfless contribution to our student’s success, and I applaud their efforts to help ensure our students realize their full potential,” Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart said in a press release.

The College Board linked test and collegiate preparation with long-term national needs.

“When students are better prepared for college, they are more likely to do well in college, more likely to stay in college and more likely to graduate from college — the keystone of our efforts to sustain American competitiveness and prosperity long into the future.”

 



About the Author

Imani Jackson
Imani Jackson
Imani Jackson is a journalist and FAMU College of Law student with social commentary and/or news stories published on HBCU Digest, Clutch Magazine, the Daily American newspaper in Somerset, Pa, and the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education.




 
 

 
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2 Comments


  1. [...] to Advanced Placement (AP) classes and encouraging them to take college entrance exams. Last year, SAT scores for Florida’s African American and Hispanic students increased even as they stagnated in most of the [...]



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