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Opinion

5:00pm December 7, 2011

An Inconvenient Truth for a Post-Racial President

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It is both a little late and a little condescending for President Obama to claim accomplishments in aiding Black America after spending the past few years avoiding the politics of race.

For the most part, the Obama Presidency has been marked with years of notable silence on issues such as double-digit unemployment and eroding educational quality impacting Black America at epidemic levels. Now with the White House in full campaign mode, the administration has recently released “The President’s Agenda and the African American Community”, a 44-page test of Black America’s collective memory concerning Obama’s performance and advocacy.

Our collective response to the report will highlight whether President Obama will have to answer some tough questions from Black folks in 2012 or if he can sure up his most supportive voting base – a base that also requires the least amount of accountability from him.

The title of this report itself is ironic, especially in light of Mr. Obama’s track record on the presidential stage. All throughout, he has worked constantly to shed the image of being a Black president or even a president that openly exhibits an affinity and connectivity to Black America on a regular basis.

For example, the president’s “agenda” for addressing the double-unemployment rate of Black adult workers (compared to their White counterparts) and the over 40% unemployment rate of Black youth can be summarized with his statements to Black leaders in 2010 “…a rising tide (for the nation) lifts all boats…” The White House report brags on President Obama’s desire to extend unemployment benefits to 1.4 million African-Americans, yet that effort only epitomizes the lack of true visionary advocacy that the president should have for Black people. Fighting for unemployment extensions for all Americans is not a specific fight for Black Americans that statistically face a much tighter economic crunch during this Recession.

At a time when Black Americans need a pathway to prosperity, President Obama’s lack of initiating a Black agenda has merely continued the detours of dependency in our communities. The push for Obamacare, the healthcare reform bill that has been routinely criticized as a potential killer of hundreds of thousands of American jobs, further complicates the case that this president is focused on advocacy and advancement of an African American agenda – one that promotes higher levels of prosperity.

Working with the CBC could help Obama put his alleged agenda into motion. However, the president’s recent attempt to build bridges with his former comrades in the Congressional Black Caucus was asking them to “…stop complaining…take off your house slippers (and) put on your marching shoes…” for the sake of this re-election effort. Like the CBC speech plea, the White House report of an African American agenda and any plans to start one at this point only seem to be geared towards one goal in mind: getting Mr. Obama re-elected.

These incidents are parts of a disappointing record of missteps by President Obama concerning African Americans, a reality that more Black Americans now admit privately but refuse to state publicly for fear of “selling out” the first Black president. Truth be told, this president has actually used the national platform to insistently state that he is not specifically focused on the issues of African Americans. To have his White House staff suggest otherwise is another example of the height of condescension towards African American voters that gave the president 96% of their votes in 2008 but are barely 85% employed.

When Attorney General Eric Holder noted in 2009 the increasing racial disparities and other issues of race in America, President Obama’s response was that he “would not have used the same language,” distancing himself from the conversation of race in America. That’s not empathy with Black people, especially after untold thousands celebrated his inauguration with a gaudy display of consumerism.

When the president’s budget proposals actively supported the continued federal funding of Planned Parenthood (an organization with a highly questionable past) while offering to cut Pell Grant funding for at-risk summer college students (including lower-income Black students in most need), one has to ask: how is that advocacy for America’s Black community? That said, the priorities of this White House regarding some of its funding choices become clear when considering the president’s first executive order in 2009 and the Planned Parenthood question.

There are more head-scratching moves that this administration has made towards funding priorities and Black interests that refute the White House’s recent attempt to re-write political history. Cuts by this administration to GOP-supported funding of HBCUs and of the DC voucher program - a much-needed program designed to provide at-risk Black students in Washington DC access to quality education – prompted the question in 2009: where is the advocacy by this White House for America’s Black students? If education is the key (as it has always been for Black America’s advancement out of oppression), why has it been treated so inconsistently by the first Black president, one with an “African American Agenda” that was reported just in time for the 2012 election season?

Lacking consistent advocacy on the education, employment, or public safety fronts, the presidential candidate that had the ability to uplift the nation with a deeper, more meaningful connection with Black America during his tenure as president has repeatedly shown that he does not have an African American agenda, despite the misleading title of the White House report.

It’s a document that is best deemed as campaign literature, not governmental analysis.

When potential GOP opponents can continue deriding this reality throughout 2011 with little response from the White House until now, the truth should appear striking to potential voters.

The inconvenient truth for this post-racial president: claiming to be an advocate for the Black community during this emerging campaign season, yet avoiding race-based positions and advocacy as much as possible, yields neither advocacy nor leadership. Tragically for the White House (and for Black America in general), it does not meet the definition of having an “agenda,” either.

Will Black voters still support President Obama? Yes, but not at the 2008 clip. Despite what they will admit aloud, they have realized over the past few years that rhetoric promising advocacy has not proven to produce a change in reality for Black America. They will also soon discover that a White House report submitted after years of a distant relationship with Black America does not meet the requirements of a Black agenda – unless, of course, that agenda is purely a political one.

Lenny McAllister is a political commentator found every Saturday with host TJ Holmes and fellow pundit Maria Cardona on “CNN Saturday Morning” at 10:30 AM Eastern (9:30 Central / 7:30 AM Pacific.) This week’s “Saturday Remix” is available exclusively on Politic365.



About the Author

Lenny McAllister
Lenny McAllister
Lenny McAllister is the host of the radio show “Get Right with Lenny McAllister” found on LMGILIVE.com and often re-broadcast on Politic365. He appears weekly on “CNN Saturday Morning” with host Randi Kaye and former DNC Communications Director Maria Cardona at 10:30 AM Eastern Time. He also regularly appears weekdays on CNN's "Early Start" at 5am - 7am and "CNN Newsroom" at 12:30pm Eastern. He also appears as a political commentator on multiple outlets including Sirius-XM Radio, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, ABC Radio in Australia, and Chicago Public Radio. Lenny has written previously for a number of publications including Rushmore Drive, Global Grind, and The Chicago Defender. In 2009, McAllister was a panelist at the 10th Annual State of the Black Union and the CNN panel discussion Young & Black In America: Empowering the Next Generation of African American Leaders. In 2010, Lenny was featured in the Studio 360 series “American Icons” in the episode, The Autobiography of Malcolm X. He was also featured in the November 2010 Essence Magazine roundtable discussion “Race (Still) Matters” that featured the Rev. Al Sharpton, NAACP President Ben Jealous, and CNN’s Soledad O’Brien.




 
 

 
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7 Comments


  1. Furious Styles

    You are one of the complainers. Got no ideas yourself but you know what everyone else is doing wrong. Taking one line from a speech and using it out of context, as you did with the President's CBC speech, is a typical hater move. AND so what if his current efforts are to get reelected. His opposition's goal since the day he took office 3 years ago has been to cause him to fail at any cost. Might that be a factor of the condidtion our condition is in?


  2. [...] An Inconvenient Truth for a Post-Racial PresidentPolitic365It is both a little late and a little condescending for President Obama to claim accomplishments in aiding Black America after spending the past few years avoiding the politics of race. For the most part, the Obama Presidency has been marked with years …and more » [...]


  3. [...] An Inconvenient Truth for a Post-Racial PresidentPolitic365It is both a little late and a little condescending for President Obama to claim accomplishments in aiding Black America after spending the past few years avoiding the politics of race. For the most part, the Obama Presidency has been marked with years …and more » [...]


  4. I can understand what this perspective is born of, but I disagree. I think this shows the catch-22 Barack Obama has faced and will continue to face – the why some intelligent analysts refer to this president as "the first and the last" black presidency. This is as good an indication as any of the weird dynamic that has mired this presidency to some degree. African Americans, and all Americans for that matter, projected their hopes and expectations onto this presidency. Barack Obama's campaign, and ultimately the well-spoken, thoughtful individual that he is, made this easy. When there was no immediate post-inauguration utopia to sweep over the nation, people returned to their usual fearful, jaded and dependent selves. The most powerful theme from the Obama campaign that has been under served by the Obama administration, is that of reminding the people – as Obama did in the CBC speech – that fixing this nation is going to take a remarkable effort on our parts. We seem unable or unwilling to pay attention and act on this part of the narrative. I am sure he has done some things that he genuinely believes to be in service of advancing the status of African Americans in this country, but with all that is going on around him, how much can we really expect this presidency to take on issues near and dear to the hearts of just black people?


  5. btraven

    You have to wonder why has the first black President done so little for black America, particularly the 2/3 of black America left behind by the economic advances of the last thirty years?

    It just might be that his own early pseudo-radicalism – schooled in the bizarre racialist politics of Bill Ayers and Jeremiah Wright – acts as a lodestone around his neck. He risks being "outed" as a race card advocate if he takes the slightest serious move to the left on this issue, so he does nothing.

    In other words, even black America has to ask, would we have been better off with an ordinary liberal?

    Of course, the wider economic crisis makes the situation faced by many white Americans and other minorities indistinguishable from that of many blacks. We are beyond the point where even ordinary liberalism has any answers for the vast majority. That may explain the presence of many black citizens in the Occupy movement in cities like Oakland.


  6. [...] is not the first time that the Obama Administration has targeted meager but life-enabling programs that aid poor [...]


  7. [...] is not the first time that the Obama Administration has devalued life-enabling programs that aid the poor in vital need [...]



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